Slideshow: My Pie Monday: Blue Cheese, Truffle Salt, Detroit-Style Pizza, and More!

SkyHighGluten's Hobart-mixed Pizza
SkyHighGluten's Hobart-mixed Pizza
"Here's an 11-inch wood-fired pizza baked in about 50 seconds at about 900°F. Toppings are super simple: Paradiso EVOO and Italian white truffle salt. The dough recipe is from an Italian guy from Sardinia and is a new one for me: 2/3 A/P flour, 1/3 fine semolina, 60% hydration, 3.6% salt, 0.4% fresh yeast and a splash of EVOO. Twenty-minute mix on low speed in a 30 quart Hobart.

"It was my first time using a Hobart and I didn't realize the friction factor was so darn high, especially compared with my KitchenAid. The dough came out of the mixer at a whopping 89°F. Ouch! I gave it a two-hour bulk fermentation with three folds and then divided and shaped in 225-gram balls for a two-day retard in standard plastic dough boxes. Crust ended up light and crispy and the char was near-perfect but the crumb was kind of dry. Also, some of the dough balls ended up with dry skin after a day or two in the fridge and had to be tossed. (Not sure why some and not all.) Anyway, I think more hydration, much colder water, a bit more evoo and a shorter mix with autolyse might do the trick for next time.

"Anybody out there ever used a Hobart? What's the estimated friction factor for a dough like this? I'm estimating 51. Also, 20 minutes seems kind of long for a mix, at least to me. I'm an 'improved mix' kind of guy, for the record, but I've been told 20 minutes is the standard for Neapolitan pizza (which is usually made with a fork mixer, right?) and seems far gentler than a Hobart. What's the equivalent mix time for a Hobart, I wonder, to get strong, expandable, extensible dough? The kind you can throw in the air and spin on your finger? Any and all suggestions are welcome..."

Flaksman's Fig Jam, Prosciutto, and Blue Cheese Pizza
Flaksman's Fig Jam, Prosciutto, and Blue Cheese Pizza
"My wife and I recently had a wonderful appetizer at a wine bar which consisted of a crostini, fig jam, prosciutto, and brie. I thought this would make a wonderful pizza. My dough consists of high-gluten flour, salt, water, olive oil, and a small amount of sugar. I let my dough rise for two hours after kneading and then I refrigerate for three days. On the day I make the pizza I proof it at room temperature for about 2 1/2 hours. I didn’t want the fig jam to really cook so I brushed the dough with olive oil and par-baked it. I am using a Weber gas grill with a pizza stone which I preheat for one hour. After parbaking the crust I topped it with the jam, prosciutto, and blue cheese and put it back on the grill/stone for one minute to heat everything through. The pizza was really good. My wife thought I put too much jam on the pizza and as much as I hate to ever admit I am wrong, I think she was probably right. Otherwise, I think fig jam on a pizza might be pizza history in the making."
Zane Hunt's Detroit-Style Sopressata and Arugula Pizza
Zane Hunt's Detroit-Style Sopressata and Arugula Pizza
Zane Hunt from Pizzahunt sent us this:

"When I moved away from my hometown of Detroit I knew I would have an immediate separation anxiety as you can’t find Detroit-style pies in too many cities. My brother and I sat out to make our own. We start with a 24- to 36-hour poolish and then add it into our 65% hydration dough recipe. We use a double press into the 10-inch-by-14-inch black steel pans. Refrigerated overnight, the next day we top the Detroit-style pies the old-school way, side to side cheese (brick and mozz) to get a killer caramelized cheese crust and then the sauce on top. The toppings change from pie to pie but mirror the taste of home that we miss."

Olsonmatt's Bianca
Olsonmatt's Bianca
"Here is a pie that I made for my wife, Bianca—it is a Bianca pizza. It has chili oil, Parmigiano-Reggiano, caramelized onions, and fresh garlic. I have changed oven placement, and am not quite getting the color that I want, but the pies are still tasty. Happy New Year to all Slice'rs!"
Jerkey's Burrata Pizza
Jerkey's Burrata Pizza
"I love my weekly attempt at a Margherita! I use burrata instead and add red onions. The dough isn't Neapolitan authentic, but I mix '00' with King Arthur AP. Parbake dough at 450°F, then add sauce/cheese in its final minutes."
Norma's Sweet Potato Pizza
Norma's Sweet Potato Pizza
"This was my next attempt on Tuesday at a pizza something like Jim Lahey makes at Sullivan Street Bakery, with a higher hydration and also a higher thickness factor. The pie was dressed with herb-infused olive oil, a little tomato sauce, mozzarella, and freshly grated Parmesan cheese, sweet potatoes (that I had sliced thin and left in some salt water before draining), onions, green and red peppers."