'NYC' on Serious Eats

Meet the Wood-Fired Pies at Via Tribunali's NY Outpost

On a Monday night not long ago, I popped into Via Tribunali New York, the sole East Coast outpost of the Seattle-born pizza chain. My companion and I were taken into the dining room (about the size of a rich man's tool shed), and seated under a picture of the Bay of Naples. The vista depicted the Naples of a bygone era—a nostalgic vision of the old country. More

Rizzo's Thin Crust Sicilian Meets High Expectations on the Lower East Side

Whenever I hear that an acclaimed pizzeria has expanded with a second (let alone third) branch, I can't help but let loose a skeptical eyebrow raise, a tilt of the head, a smirk of a shrug. If you're like me, get ready for a pleasant surprise, because Rizzo's latest outpost is turning out pies that stand up to the original storefront's (and give them a run for their money, to boot). More

Ribalta: Neo-Neapolitan in Union Square

At Ribalta, pizzas are leavened by a natural starter that was brought back from Italy—it's somewhere between 80 and 100 years old, and over the course of a five to seven day rise it brings a noticeable lightness and cultured flavor to the dough. But unlike certain Neapolitan pizzerias that take a monastic approach to the One and Only pie, Ribalta plays around with tradition—just ask the hot dog and fries pizza or the limoncello-marinated chicken wings. More

NYC Pizza Crawl: Where Do You Take Out-of-Towners?

So, I've got a couple of friends staying with me for a few days in New York. One has been here before. The other is an English boy living in Los Angeles who is here for the very first time, which, to me, means one thing: we need to get this guy some pizza, stat. So much pizza, so little time. Where do I start, and where would you take them? More

Brooklyn: New Franny's Going Strong

A Brooklynite myself, I'll admit to a tinge of favoritism when I declare that there's no better borough for pizza. Or, to be a little more diplomatic, let's say that it's home to the city's greatest concentration of top notch pies. We've got the classics, like Totonno's, Grimaldi's, and Di Fara, along with a slew of (relative) newcomers—Roberta's, Paulie Gee's, and Best Pizza, to name just a few. And, of course, there's Franny's. We finally made it over to their new-and-improved location to check in on their pies. More

Top This: The Hellboy (à la Paulie Gee's)

Three years ago, Paulie Giannone told then-music supervisor Mike Kurtz he could apprentice at his newly opened pizzeria, Paulie Gee's. Mike told Paulie, "Next week, when I come in, I'm going to bring my condiment." It wasn't long before the two pizzaioli figured out that Mike's chile and vinegar-spiked honey and Paulie's Dellboy pizza (a salty, meaty, piquant pizza made with spicy sopressata, fresh mozz, and parmigiano reggiano) were a match made in pizza heaven. And that's how the aptly named Hellboy, a must-order pie on the Paulie Gee's menu, was born. More

New York: A Pleasant, Thin-Crust Surprise at Emporio

Shock, dismay, shame...let's just say it was quite the humbling moment when I realized we had yet to review—let alone try— the pies at Emporio. Not only is the modest, inviting restaurant located mere blocks from Serious Eats HQ, but we really, really like the place. The two Roman-style pizzas I encountered on a recent visit proved revelatory—if not on a city-wide scale, certainly on a how-did-I-not-know-this-was-in-my-neighborhood one. More

Brooklyn Central Pizza: Neapolitan Pies Celebrate the Best of Two Worlds

Welcoming, low-key, warm; it's a formula that seems to define a burgeoning class of pizzeria, of the wood-fired, Neapolitan, up-and-coming Brooklyn variety. And it looks great. But all too often, it simply doesn't add up to very good food. So, while I may have found Brooklyn Central charming, I wasn't exactly holding my breath for great pizza. Boy, was I off the mark. More

First Look: Brooklyn Central in Park Slope

Brooklyn Central, a new restaurant on Fifth Avenue in Park Slope, isn't your typical Neapolitan Pizzeria. The restaurant, named after the old elevated railway that once ran through the neighborhood, is a collaboration between Hyland and Roberto Patriarca, who met working at Sottocasa. Hyland previously worked at The Spotted Pig and The Breslin, and Patriarca is an i Trulli alum. More

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