'how-to' on Serious Eats

Top This: The Lombarda (à la Osteria)

The Lombarda has been on the menu at Osteria since day one. And thinking back to 2007, it was a time when topping a pizza with an oozy, baked egg was pretty revolutionary. Taking a the time that Chefs Marc Vetri and Jeff Michaud spent cooking in the Lombardia region of Italy this pie is topped with two regional specialties, house made cotechino sausage spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg and nutty Bitto cheese, along with fresh fresh mozzarella made by DiBruno Bothers, and a swipe of tomato sauce. Oh, and then there's that egg. More

Scott's Pizza Chronicles: Fried Pizza

Fried pizza is real and New York is currently experiencing its first real dose in the deep fryer. It's soft with a thin crisp on the outside, deceivingly light and airy, and unbelievably addictive, but what exactly is it and where does it come from? More

Top This: Pizza Antica's Broccoli Rabe, Caciocavalo, Burrata and Chili Oil

With beach views and fire pits, the Dining Deck of Santa Monica Place has quickly become a popular public space in Los Angeles. In this lovely setting sits Pizza Antica — not to be confused with Antica Pizzeria. With four locations in California, Executive Chef Gordon Drysdale's American-inspired Italian food is market-driven with a seasonal rotation of increasingly popular pizzas. Their Roman-style pies have a thin, crisp crust with absolutely no sag. For this edition of Top This, we learn how to make their addictive Broccoli Rabe, Caciocavalo, Burrata and Chili Oil pizza. More

The Pizza Lab: Which Rack Should I Put My Stone On?

In his recipe for thin crust pizza from Cook's Illustrated, Andrew Janjigian takes the novel approach of placing the stone on the top rack of the oven. This is totally contradictory to what most pizza authorities recommend: putting the stone on the bottom rack (or even the floor of the oven) in order to maximize the amount of heat it absorbs. So why does this method work? More

Sourdough Starter-Along: Day 7 - Feed And Wait

Just like the previous few days, today we're going to add another ounce each of flour and water. Bubble activity is definitely increasing. One thing to look for is how fast the bubbles come back after stirring. It's one thing to see bubbles first thing in the morning, but it's not ready to bake until it's a little more lively. More

Sourdough Starter-Along: Day 5 - Keep Feeding and Stirring!

From now on, it's all about feeding once a day and stirring whenever you think about it. Unlike some recipes that require each feeding to double the existing amount of starter, I feed the same amount each day. Just add one ounce each of flour and water. We won't try to double it until we're getting ready to bake with the starter. More

Pizza Protips: Deciphering Refined Wheat Flour

Wheat flour is a lot more complex than most flour labels would have you believe. While some companies do a decent job at defining what type of wheat is in the bag, others require a little more research. Before you start that research, though, you need to know just a little about the different types of wheat, and what they're good for. More

Pizza Protips: Salt

Salt isn't absolutely required to make bread or pizza dough, but without it, breads simply taste flat—even sweet breads. That's reason enough to add it. But there's more: salt also strengthens and tightens the gluten and regulates the activity of yeast. Without any salt, some breads can rise unpredictably. More

Pizza Protips: Sugar

Sugar is an oft-misunderstood ingredient in dough. Some people believe that it's necessary to include sugar to feed the yeast. In truth, yeast is perfectly happy munching on flour. On the other hand, sugar plays several roles in dough besides that of yeast-food. Like salt, it's a flavor enhancer. Sugar helps create a fine crumb and also tenderizes dough. More

Top This: Julienned Pepperoni

[Photograph: Adam Kuban] Though beloved by many, pepperoni may not be the most novel topping out there. And that's probably an understatement, seeing how it's actually the most-ordered topping in the U.S. according to many surveys that I am too lazy to google at the moment. (Oh, wait ... here you go). So what happens if you want to do something new with it? Aside from switching over to hot soppressata, you could try cutting it differently — and that's exactly what I'm going to show you.... after the jump.... More

The Pieman's Craft: Paulie Gee's 'Egyptian Move' Pizza-Dough-Stretching Technique

If you follow along in the Slice comments section, you may have seen talk of Paul "Paulie Gee" Giannone's Egyptian move dough-stretching technique. When we visited Paulie to chat pizza recently, we asked him to demonstrate. You'll see it's a bit different from the dough-stretching moves that other pizza-makers featured on these pages have used. Paulie simply opens up the dough a bit and lets it hang off the side of the make table, outsourcing some of the stretching to good ol' gravity. Peep the vid above for the skinny. More

More Posts